All posts by orlandohand

Anup Patel, MD, MBA Named University of Florida Outstanding Young Alumus

GAINESVILLE, FLA. – Dr. Anup Patel is one of a select group of University of Florida alumni named to this year’s prestigious “40 Under 40.” Honorees receiving 2019 Outstanding Young Alumni awards were recognized during a campus ceremony on Saturday, April 13.

The annual awards program was established in 2006 to recognize alumni under the age of 40 whose achievements positively reflect The Gator Nation. Criteria for the competitive award include making a significant impact on the candidate’s industry and having civic or professional accomplishments at the state, national or international level.

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AdventHealth and Orlando Hand Surgery Associates Strike Partnership

ORLANDO, Fla., April 7, 2019 — AdventHealth, formerly known as Florida Hospital, has struck an affiliation with Orlando Hand Surgery Associates, an independent hand surgery group, to create a regional hand surgery center.

The Hand to Shoulder Center, which will be located on Princeton Avenue on AdventHealth Orlando’s campus, will include a walk-in clinic, a surgical center, a biomechanics lab, skills and cadaver lab, a microvascular lab and teaching and rehabilitation center. Leaders expect to start a hand surgery fellowship training in 2020. The center will also include satellite offices across Central Florida.

“We’re developing a regional hand center,” said Dr. George White, president of Orlando Hand Surgery and the director of the new center. “There’s no place in the Southeastern United States that puts everything that we do together in one place.”

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AdventHealth, Orlando Hand Surgery Associates Announce Affiliation

OHSA physicians will begin practicing at AdventHealth campuses this summer, offering personalized upper-extremity orthopedic care close to home.

ORLANDO, Fla., April 1, 2019 — AdventHealth and Orlando Hand Surgery Associates are pleased to announce an affiliation that will significantly expand exceptional upper-extremity orthopedic care in Central Florida. Together, OHSA and AdventHealth will establish The Hand to Shoulder Center, which will focus on providing personalized treatment options. The Center will include additional offices and physicians, our new walk-in clinic, hospital and emergency facilities, specialized diagnostic facilities and a research department including a biomechanics lab, skills and cadaver lab and a microvascular lab and a new teaching and rehabilitation center.  A Hand Fellowship training the hand surgeons of the future will start in 2020.

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What is a Ganglion Cyst?

A ganglion cyst is a common condition within the hand and wrist. These cysts are noncancerous and appear as a lump or bump underneath the skin. A ganglion cyst is commonly located on the top of the wrist, the palm side of the wrist, the base of the finger, and the top of the finger (near the nail bed.)

Symptoms

Ganglion cysts can be categorized by location, size and pain. They usually surface from the fluid filled areas on the ligaments or between the bones. These cysts most commonly occur on the wrist or hand.

The size of the cyst can fluctuate. The fluid within the cyst can thicken over time causing it to become firm and progressively larger in size.

Often times a cyst is painless. If there is discomfort or pain, it could be due to pressure from the cyst pressing on a nerve. Discomfort from a cyst can include tingling, numbness, and muscle weakness.

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The Difference Between Tennis Elbow and Golfer’s Elbow

Tennis elbow and golfer’s elbow are two common conditions that can cause pain to the elbow. Despite their names, tennis elbow is not limited to tennis players, and golfer’s elbow is not limited to golfers. Both conditions can occur due to a number of different occupations and activities. It can sometimes be difficult for those dealing with elbow pain to determine which condition they may be experiencing. Below we have listed information on both conditions and the characteristics that make them different.

What is Tennis Elbow? 

In this video, Dr. Jason Pirozzolo explains tennis elbow, and provides exercises that may help alleviate pain.

Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a condition involving the tendons that attach to the bone on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow.

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Shoulder Pain: Nonsurgical and Surgical Solutions

The shoulder is compromised of several joints that work together to provide us with a wide range of motion. Because we use our shoulders to perform a variety of different tasks throughout the day, it can be prone to injury and pain.

Treatment options for shoulder pain will vary depending on the severity of the injury or condition. Below, we have listed some of the most common causes of shoulder pain along with common treatment options. As with any condition or injury, it’s best to consult a doctor in order to receive a proper evaluation and treatment plan.

Common Causes of Shoulder Pain:

  • Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: 
    shoulder pain - dr. jason pirozzolo - shoulder bursitis

    Dr. Jason Pirozzolo explains shoulder bursitis.

    Shoulder impingement syndrome is a collection of shoulder symptoms related to impingement, bursitis, and tendinitis in and around the shoulder joint. The most common symptom of shoulder impingement is pain, especially when one tries to use the affected arm above the level of the head (e.g., overhead activity, throwing).

  • Arthritis:
    Arthritis in the shoulder usually results in swelling, pain and stiffness. Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis in the shoulder. Pain due to osteoarthritis may worsen over time.
  • Instability:
    Instability occurs when the head of the upper arm bone is forced out of the shoulder socket. Instability is usually the result of an injury or overuse. Sometimes instability, or a dislocation, can occur repeatedly which can increase the risk of arthritis developing in the shoulder.
  • Fracture:
    A fracture, also known as a broken bone, often occurs as the result of a traumatic injury. Shoulder fractures in older patients can occur after a fall. Shoulder fractures are also common in high-energy contact sports.
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prp for wrist osteoarthritis

Regenerative Platelet Rich Plasma Injections for Wrist Osteoarthritis

Orlando, Florida – Wrist osteoarthritis is a “wear and tear” degeneration of the joint surfaces in your wrist. The wrist contains 8 carpal bones that serve as a junction between the other bones of your thumb, hand and forearm. Inflammation can occur at any of these joint surfaces, causing pain and decreased range of motion. Your doctor can make the diagnosis of wrist osteoarthritis by your history, physical examination, and x-rays.

Wrist osteoarthritis can range from mildly irritating to severely debilitating. Gordie Howe, a.k.a. “Mister Hockey,” had to retire from the game because of severe arthritis in his left wrist. Howe is widely regarded as one of the greatest hockey players of all time, but wrist osteoarthritis prematurely ended his career in the National Hockey League.

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finger arthritis platelet rich plasma orlando hand surgery

Finger Arthritis and Platelet Rich Plasma Treatments

Orlando, Florida – Finger arthritis is one of the most common forms of osteoarthritis, and the prevalence is expected to increase as the population ages.1 Finger arthritis causes pain, loss of function, decreased ability to grip objects with the hand, and it reduces overall quality of life.1 Healthcare professionals can diagnose finger osteoarthritis through a detailed history and physical examination along with radiological studies, such as hand x-rays.

Finger osteoarthritis may be caused by a single major injury or repetitive use, i.e., small injuries that accumulate over time.2 For example, NBA player Kobe Bryant has severe osteoarthritis in his right index finger. He likely developed the condition from a combination of major injury and continued, repetitive use while playing basketball.

Finger Arthritis and Platelet Rich Plasma Treatments

The current goal of finger osteoarthritis treatment is to alleviate symptoms such as pain. Thus, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly prescribed treatment. NSAIDs may be taken orally or applied topically. Likewise, topical capsaicin has also been used to treat finger osteoarthritis. While splints, the application of heat or ice, and even assistive devices have been tried, they result in little to no improvement.1Physical therapy exercises may decrease pain and increase strength and range of motion. Unlike rheumatoid arthritis, there are no disease modifying drugs available for finger osteoarthritis.1 Occasionally, steroid injections may be used to treat finger osteoarthritis, but their benefits are limited.1 If nonsurgical treatments fail to provide adequate relief, surgery may be attempted.

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Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy for Shoulder Impingement, Bursitis, Tendonitis

Platelet Rich Plasma for Shoulder Impingement, Bursitis, Tendinitis

Orlando, Florida – Shoulder impingement syndrome is a collection of shoulder symptoms related to impingement, bursitis, and tendinitis in and around the shoulder joint. The most common symptom of shoulder impingement is pain, especially when one tries to use the affected arm above the level of the head (e.g., overhead activity, throwing). There may be pain over the deltoid muscle or the outside of the upper arm as well.1 Since shoulder impingement syndrome includes inflammation of the bursa, rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and labrum, the physical examination findings are extensive. Physicians often find evidence of shoulder bursitis and tendinitis along with generalized pain and inflammation. X-rays, ultrasound, or MRI may be used to confirm the diagnosis or rule out other possible causes of shoulder pain.

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What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common and painful disorder of the wrist and hand. In most cases, carpal tunnel syndrome symptoms worsen over time. If you think you may be dealing with carpal tunnel syndrome, it is important to receive a proper diagnosis and treatment before symptoms become more severe.

What Is carpal tunnel syndrome?

The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway that allows the median nerve to pass from the forearm to the hand. Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve is pinched or pressed. Pressure from the pinched nerve may cause swelling in the tunnel resulting in pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and wrist.

Causes

There are various factors that may contribute to the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. Risk factors for this condition include:

– Repetitive Stress
– Arthritis
– Joint dislocations
– Fractures
– Fluid retention during pregnancy
– Swelling of the flexor tendons

Symptoms

Symptoms usually occur along the nerve path and may cause the hand to “fall asleep.” Symptoms are often times felt during the night, but may be noticed during the day as well, while performing normal activities. In most cases, symptoms begin gradually and may come and go. In severe cases, permanent damage may occur, causing loss of sensation and strength in the hand and wrist.

Some symptoms include:

– Numbness and pain in the thumb, index, middle, and ring fingers
– Weak grip
– Tingling
– Sensitivity to cold
– Muscle deterioration

Diagnosis 

Providing a detailed summary of medical conditions, injuries, and how the hands are currently being used, are necessary when diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome. Nerve tests and x-rays may be taken in order to check for fractures, arthritis, and other possible nerve issues.

Treatment

Treatment options will depend on the severity of the condition. Early treatment options include:

– A wrist splint to reduce pressure on the nerve
– Steroid injections to reduce swelling
– Activity modification

If symptoms persist, or become severe, surgery may be recommended.

To learn more about carpal tunnel syndrome, make an appointment with one of our doctors at Orlando Hand Surgery Associates at any of our three locations.

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