Hand Fracture Surgery

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Hand Fracture Surgery

Overview

If you have a finger or hand fracture you might be experiencing pain or stiffness when you try to use your hand. You might also see swelling where the fracture is located, tenderness, bruising, inability to move your finger, and deformed finger. You may have recently experienced an injury such as slamming your finger in the door or you may have tried to break a fall by falling on your hand. Some even experience a finger fracture when they try to catch a ball but it jams your finger instead. Hand fracture surgery can alleviate your pain and stiffness.

How to Prepare for Hand Fracture Surgery

You won’t be able to eat the day you have surgery. You should be able to continue drinking water as normal. Just avoid drinking other beverages, like soda, juice, or milk. We may also ask that you quit taking certain medications like aspirin or anti-inflammatory drugs a few days before surgery. Make sure we know what medications you take regularly.

Procedure  

This surgery is an outpatient surgery that involves local anesthesia which means you will be able to return home once you wake up. We will create a small incision to locate the broken bones. Then we will use medical devices like screws, wires, and pins to hold the bones in place.

Recovery 

Once you wake up your hand or finger may be in a small protective cast or sling to assist with the healing process. After around four to six weeks we will remove the cast or splint and ask that you begin small rehabilitation exercises that you can do at home to help with your finger or hand’s recovery, stiffness, and swelling. You can expect a full recovery in three to four months. The pins and screws can be removed after your finger or hand has completely healed or can be left in place to ensure permanent placement.

Efficacy

Your bones are put back together using small medical devices. After your hand or finger has healed you can resume normal use.

Complications

Possible complications include infection, blood loss, and nerve damage as with any surgery.

Outlook

The outlook of this surgery is good. Typically patients who have this surgery see a positive outcome.